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20121128
20121128
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happened in katrina. nbc's katy tur is with us from the hard hit jersey shore tonight. katy, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian. that is certainly the big question, up and down the new jersey shore, the aftereffects of sandy are still being felt. we're on long beach island. it's a barrier island, it's literally where the atlantic ocean meets the bay. and here, dozens of homes still look like this, their bottom floors completely washed away when the powerful storm surge came through. the last time kyle burns house looked like this was 1950, the year it was built. >> bed, couches, chairs, everything was just floating around. it was a mess. >> reporter: two feet of rushing water and sand soaked this third generation family beach home. with gas lines restored, the people of colgate on lbi are finally allowed to come back. >> they're old. '78. >> reporter: as residents count their personal losses, state officials are looking at the big numbers. >> when you look at the damage done because of the density of new york, the number of people affected, the number of properties affected wa
the kind of decisions that had to be made during katrina and other events. instead of having a set standard of care, even if it's an altered or austere standard of care, what we want to have is good decision framework. until you are in the situation you can't determine what you would actually be doing and what resources are still available. >> do we have other questions from our audience? one final question and this is for our civilians. you got to see all kinds of cool stuff yesterday down at moffat's field. i want to see if there's one or two that stuck out. >> i think the c130 definitely blew me away, the fact it can transport 92 people, patients, was incredible. the other 1 that stands out is the mobile decon patient, that it can decontaminate a patient that was not able to stand. >> the team from the hospital that i was with and the other hospitals really looked at what were their hands on capabilities and some of the things that stood out the most is a portable oxygen generator that sits in the corner of the shock trauma platoon unit and doesn't have to be hooked up to our large l
and even katrina and the gulf war spill most recently. closer to home the golden gate bridge connects not only our park lands but our communities. since 9/11 it really has connected our law enforcement public safety officials even more seriously and with greater intent as we protect the bridge from any threat. americas cup, the races here have fostered even greater coordination and partnership with the department of emergency management in the city, city fire department, city police department and the coast guard. and we look forward to working with san francisco and our local governments and the military to make our emergency planning even more effective. so, thank you again for your time and we'll see you out in the park. (applause) >> thank you. i learned a lot on that talk i didn't know. that was great. it's now my pleasure to introduce our speaker, keynote speaker for this morning. but before i do that, i want to recognize his wife. it is an honor for many women who are married to significant dignitaries in our country where they become the sponsors for various ships. and it's a
disaster yet. we have had disasters, i was in katrina on an urban search and rescue team, i've been in pretty much all major engagements as far as wild land fires in california, but if you look at a global disaster perspective where you have a hundred thousand victims like a tsunami or a large scale event, we have yet to experience that in this nation. i think the agreements we have here today and the relationships we develop today are going to be key to mitigate that. the other scenario that we are concerned with is a coordinated aerial incendiary attack by al qaeda. one of the things we've seen already in the european union is suspect of al qaeda starting fires in the eu if that happened in california in the right weather conditions, it would be disasterous and everybody in this room would likely be involved. but to go back, it's all -- for me it's all about relationships, it's all about communication and respecting each other's mission. we certainly appreciate our relationships with all 3 agencies up here. the last thing i would say with respect to technology, one of the thin
the way from 9-11 through katrina to whatever the next catastrophe is going to be. we live in a nuclear age. who would have predicted the united states would be fully invested in a response in japan? who would have predicted several years ago when a tsunami hit a country in indonesia which was predominately anti-american in its sentiment, mostly because of disinformation, mostly because as people grew up there they were given propaganda and told stories about the american those and what we do and how we do it, and they learned to feel we were the enemy. then they saw through that catastrophe, they saw the response of the lincoln battle group, they saw american military men and women in uniform as well as partnering with non-governmental organizations like project hope, operation smile, doctors without borders, they saw all those people coming off the ships and taking care of their loved ones, taking care of those who were hopeless and helpless. they saw that and it turned them around. it made the world a better place. it certainly made indonesia a better place, but it made the worl
after hurricane katrina, which we all know will be probably the greatest civil engineering set of blunders that our country has made in our country's history. and what we all learn from hurricane katrina is what happens when we don't have a community that is prepared and a set of relationships that is ready to be hit by the big one. which leads me to the third reason why i wake up at night. the neighborhoods that i represent in the northeast not only represent the oldest neighborhoods in our city, but some of the most vulnerable. we have some of the poorest residents. half of my district are recent immigrants who are mono lingual. i have hundreds of constituents who live in buildings that contain them where they live three, four, five people in a room that might be no larger than 10 by 15 feet, in buildings that are absolutely prone to earthquake, fire, and the next major disaster. and, so, i was asked to just mention if i had three things that i want you to tell us as your civilian leaders. the first has to do with how to deal with community shock. two nights ago as a couple o
katrina. and another key part of partnerships, when i was the federal on scene coordinator during deep water horizon, it's not in the national response framework, but every parish president, every mayor, every governor had a coast guard liaison officer at the oak pride and above level. so, if they didn't like how the response was going, go to my liaison officer. don't go to anderson cooper and then cause the white house to react to what they're seeing on cnn. so, how do you get in front of that news cycle? and the only way you can do that as tip o'neill said, all things in politics are local and i think we heard from vice admiral nathan that i think all responses are local as well. and, so, we really need to start most importantly at the local level, at those planning levels, because the first shot of any campaign, the plan will change, but the partnerships need to remain constant. >> and, general baldwin, we heard from colonel span owe about now your three hats of authority, your state hat, your federal hat, and now your dual status hat. but if you could talk about the partnerships an
inspired as i watched this council hold hearings in the wake of hurricane katrina to talk about plans on how to integrate people with disabilities into the emergency plans. and to be part of the mayor's office of disability. and be part of the disability disaster preparedness movement. we have appreciated your leadership, your institutional knowledge. many times over the years as i heard the council hearing cases i see you make that connection to another hearing that was held maybe a year or two before, and seeing the larger picture really of what we are trying to accomplish here in san francisco. i wish you the best with love, with good speed. we hope to hear from you soon. congratulations. >> thank you very much. thank you. >> jewels, i've only known you a few short months. i don't know you as well as i would like. however, i have observed of thing or two. you move through the world with an elegance and style that is impressive. your eloquent and passionate. i listen when you speak i want to thank you for the experience of working with you. >> thank you very much. it means a
by new york's bravest following katrina. those tragedies kind of bonding those cities. nice to see that for sure. use all the help they can get. >> paying it forward coming full circle. >>> a half billion dollars worth of dreams, powerball players are lining up and dreaming of living large. what you told us that you would really do with $500 million. i have to say we appreciate the honesty. >> that's for sure. >>> also, the last dance. "dancing with the stars" crowns an all-star winner and all will be revealed coming up in "the skinny." don't want to miss that. >>> but we do begin with breaking news this morning about that horrific factory fire in bangladesh. >> this is hard to even get your mind around. police have arrested three managers and accused them of locking the doors so the workers could not get out. the 112 people died in the fire, records show workers made clothes for wal-mart, sears as well as our parent company disney. >> bangladesh police say the managers stopped workers from leaving saying the alarm was just a routine fire drill. police also questioned the company's
and i were down at katrina right after it happened and one of the issues, you know, there were many medical issues. one was pharmaceuticals. did you discuss in this pharmaceuticals and how you would get your pharmaceuticals? >> we didn't specifically discuss it. we did i think in the shock trauma platoon know about what medications are carried on the c130, what medications were available. during the hhs presentation there was talk about the large manufacturers, if there were problems getting medications, that the federal government could facilitate that. but it is a great point. it's something locally we are working on with our pharmaceutical group because it is a big concern if we do lose supply how do we replenish that. san francisco does not have a lot of storage space so we are not able to store medications to a great extent in the area. >> i was just going to echo, our capability does come with its own internal pharmaceutical supply, although it is limited and so that would be important for us to understand what the resupply process would be as we move forward on that. so
and in some respects, it was a natural process after hurricane katrina where they could start over again. the other places homeland where i think there is more choice. if you look at the results, it is amazing. but about a third of the kids in harlem are in this district. they went up dramatically when they started this process there. it was something like 28 out of 30, now it is about 16. not only did the charter school is almost outperformed everybody, but the public schools, which were 28, actually moved up significantly themselves. so i think those are two substantiation of models that could be developed. so in terms of difference of reforming and relinquishing, i think it is very important as an idea that needs development. that is where i would come down. >> i would have to agree that it is choice. for two reasons. there is a catalytic effect, if you will. going against an attrition or a system, if the college isn't getting applicants, he will either go out of business or there is a catalytic effect on the underperformers of having people be able to make choices with their kids, an
daniel christman used katrina as an example of how extreme weather can cause negative operational impacts to our military. in response to katrina the national guard mobilized 58,000 national guard members to the relief effort at the same time that 79,000 guard members were deployed fighting the war on terrorism. the generals pointed out that although louisiana's physical infrastructure did not hold, our national guard did hold. but the limits of even our exceptional national guard will be tested by these changes in extreme weather. and it is imperative that we prepare our emergency management and responders for a new normal of new extremes. climate change will also create new strategic challenges. climate events such as droughts and heat waves, floods and storms exacerbate political and military tensions in areas around the world with fragile governments and instability. this can result in violent conflict and in refugee problems. it is not just the shock of extreme weather that portends danger. as the temperature of the air and ocean steadily rises the amount of moisture in the atmospher
city firefighters head to new orleans to help after hurricane katrina? firefighters from the big easy now returning the favor. 40 new orleans firefighters are headed to areas destroyed by sandy that will spend two weeks helping the fire department of new york clean houses and if need be, fight fires. >> we want to inspire these guys, like they inspired us when we saw coming down here. >> there is hope. you can rebuild and you can come back. i'm speaking from experience, unfortunately. i lost my house in katrina and again recently in hurricane isaac. >> steve: southwest airlines heard about it and offered to fly all the firefighters to new york for free. >> brian: college in north carolina could be heading to court after taking the christmas out of christmas trees. yep. the alliance defending freedom group turning to sue western piedmont community college accusing them of violating the first amendment right. students submitted an announcement for their christmas tree sale. but when posted on-line, it was changed to holiday trees instead. the school apparently says it can't market the s
'm a big obvious looking lesbian and they called me after hurricane katrina. >> i don't think they would turn down aid after a natural disaster. >> and there are places where they may be the only place that can offer to different communities. but they needed to come into the 21st century. just like the boy scouts. >> stephanie: yes, your morals are in the right place. 29 minutes after the hour. we'll be right back on "the stephanie miller show." so the last thing our country needs is to have fewer teachers in our schools. >> those greedy teachers, cops and firemen, clearly. soft, sweet coconut covered in rich, creamy chocolate. almond joy and mounds. unwrap paradise. [ ♪ music ♪ ] >> announcer: ah ah, you fools. you fell victim to one of the classic blunders. the first is never get involve in a land war in asia. but never go in against--stephanie miller--when guests are on the line. [ laughing ] >> stephanie: this is the stephanie miller. 34 minutes after the hour. >> a movie other than "american presidents." >> i know. >> stephanie: someone tweeted us. >> yes patrick tweeted and s
. sandy is expected to be the second most expensive disaster in u.s. history behind hurricane katrina. allstate is the largest publicly-traded home and auto insurer in the united states. >>> your holiday travel plans will cost you more this year. travel sites orbitz and kayak predict travelers traveling to top destinations will pay 8% more than they did last year. that is the latest from the fox business network, giving you the power to prosper. lori: both political sides publicly acknowledging that fiscal cliff talks are making very little progress. i'm shocked. melissa: it is shocking. lori: now president obama is meeting with chief executives for the second time in two weeks. can the business community muster pressure to bring parties closer to a deal. lou dobbs is here with his take. you must be surprised as well, sir? >> i am a little surprised. both sides said they will two out and campaign for their side. republicans say let's be reasonable. the president saying let's raise taxes on those wealthy son of a guns. i don't see what the end result here is. we had an collection. he i
katrina where they could start over again. and while there's a lot of room for improvement of great things are happening. the other places harlem where i think there's now more choice in that little neighborhood. and if you look at the results, it's amazing. about a third of the kids in harlem in the third grade are in charter schools. but what's amazing is the harlem district went up, an and this is apples to apples, went up dramatically from when we started this intensive choice process there. now, it was something like 28 out of 32 district. now it's about 16th. and not only did the charter schools outperform almost everybody, but the public schools which were 28th actually moved up significantly themselves. so i think those are two situations of models that we should develop your i think what, down in new orleans between the reform and relinquishing, and portfolio i think are really important ideas that need developing. so that's were i would comment. >> i would agree that choice, and for two reasons. the catalytic effect on the system if you will, because going to get from a tertiary
in the new orleans after katrina, when we lost technology, we lost order. we lost law and order. technology is a huge benefit but a huge risk. there are so many people who want to say that kids just can't learn. some kids just can't learn. so i would say do we really believe kids can't learn? aren't there really opportunities for kids and isn't our security at stake in a lot of other ways other than on the battle field? but in the secret in the intellectual property of the united states and the people who work for us? and when are we going connect these dots? when are we going break the system down? when are we going blow up the system and the mentality? and i'm just excited because governor bush brings us together once a year to reflect on this and we goat hear people like you help us understand. so please, help me understand how do we connect the dots? how do we make this real and how do we bring it to the urgency of? >> [inaudible] you're a man who did precisely that. i don't know people in the room know what paul did in louisiana, but you would not have had the recovery school district.
excess capital. >> you remember buffett in '05, you know, after what -- how many storms in '05 katrina. and he said, the next couple of years, nothing's going to happen, and we're going to make so much money -- and nothing did happen. >> it will be sought off. and there's this effect between the insurers and the reinsurers. you'll see also a lot of activity in european and bermuda re-insurance as those insurers have to go out. >> well, eric -- go ahead. >> i had one quick question, totally unrelated, though. it was aig, he participated four years ago now. >> yes. >> can you possibly believe that aig has come back the way it has? >> well, i think i came on the show and said -- i had this analogy, which i guess, you know, we could debate. but i said there were all these gold bricks in the mud of what was then thought of as aig and the insurance companies were the jewels of the empire. and you see now that there is at the bottom so to speak all these operating companies that were really quality, they're coming out, and i think the government ultimately did the right thing by making that p
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18